Arete 1.

Arete 1 is a new shawl pattern—a simple design to show off a good yarn, with ribbing to make it compressible and more wearable as a a scarf.

It’s a triangle.

It’s also a pretty decent shawl, with no gauge to check (knit it at a density that gives you a fabric you like) and easy customization (knit it any size).

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Dog Days for the Dog Days; Template Scarf.

This is just a very quick update, but I’ve got two new patterns coming up this weekend—Dog Days 7 (headband) and Template (scarf).

Dog Days 7 was my hiking project for a little while; Template has a pretty strong movie-night feeling to it, for me, although I didn’t watch anything specific while working up the first sample. The yarn was a commercial core-spun, and seemed a little delicate to drag along to a drive-in.

New Patterns: Small Summer Projects.

The complete .PDFs for Dog Days 6 and the Wool Market Bag launch later today! Check the Ravelry page to see them, and to get a chance at a free copy of the former.

I would highly recommend the knot version of Wool Market as a felting/fulling project—when you knit this project in wool, and then throw it in a hot washing machine with towels (this is my very imprecise go-to method for felting), it ends up being a dense, sturdy wool wristlet with a good, secure knot closure. It no longer has that dangerous stretch. I don’t really have any attractive photos of it for now, but seriously, this thing has a solid sense of utility about it. I just want to take it camping and use it as a potholder.

Another Thing: Offshoot.

If you’d like to support the future general production of mouse army knitting patterns, it’s easy to do for this one: there is a paid version available! The cost is a token $2 US. The .PDF includes this version and a slightly different one, plus a schematic. If you’d like the free version, find it below!

The Offshoot scarf is related to the Garter Scrap Shawl, but small changes make a big difference to the overall shape. This is the simplest possible version of this scarf,* and it’s the version I knit for my main sample—the one you see in all the photos. I like it a lot; it’s got a solarpunk/optimistic-but-apocalyptic feel when you drape it just right. It’s also a good way to use scraps, although a part of me would love to see it knit up from a big lot of soft, rustic woolen handspun yarn.

Knit the Offshoot from scraps, as shown, or with a deliberate, planned color-scheme of your own! It would make an excellent template for knitting a temperature scarf, or for showing off texture or color effects of big skein of special handspun. And to me, the long triangle seems preferable to a wider one, in terms of wearability.

Materials:
Materials are for the scarf as shown, and the pattern is based on worsted-weight/dk for the sake of consistency. You can knit this in any weight, at any gauge!

  • Approximately 670+ yards of soft, scarf-appropriate worsted-weight scrap yarns
  • 1 16” circular needle in US7-8/4.5-5.0mm, or size needed for gauge, or size needed for yarn weight chosen
  • Tapestry needle for weaving in ends

Gauge:
Gauge is whatever suits you and your yarn! Knit this scarf in any yarn you like, whether you want it bulky or want the luxury of fine-knit garter stitch. (I love garter stitch in fine yarn.) Gauge in the sample shown is 15 sts and 29 rows in garter stitch, prior to blocking. 

Terms used:
k—knit
p—purl 
m1r—make 1 right. I really wasn’t joking; this shawl is 3 stitches if you count this increase as a stitch. 
RS/WS—right side, wrong side. 
sl1–slip one. Sts are generally slipped purlwise unless otherwise specified.
st/s—stitch/stitches

Begin Work.
Using the cable cast-on method, CO 4 sts. Work flat. Odd rows are RS rows.

Row 1 (RS). sl1, k remaining.
All Even Rows, 2-6. sl1, p1, k remaining,
Row 3. sl1, k to last 2 sts, m1r, k2 (1 st inc) 5 sts total. 
Row 5. sl1, k to end of row.
End with Row 6.  

Rows 3-6 form the basic pattern repeat.

Repeat Rows 3-6 until triangle reaches desired size, only enough yarn remains for a standard bindoff, or you’re sick of knitting triangles. 

Bind off using the basic bindoff, working loosely and evenly for a good edge, or using an alternate flexible/stretchy substitute of your choice. 

The Wool Market Bag.

The Wool Market Bag is another one of those designs that’s been percolating since last summer. I wanted to get it done by Estes Park Wool Market, but missed it by a long shot last year, and then missed it by days this year.
This year, I didn’t even go. I made a bad choice of wool purchase and felt like I’d been, well, fleeced. (You should always check the skirting! And don’t let a random wool grower sell you on a non-coated fleece when you’re thinking about coated or even washed wool! Man I do not like washing fleece, honestly. I don’t have an efficient system for that at all.)

It turned out to be a market tote in the style of a Japanese knot bag. I’m working on a second finishing, so there will be two options. So you can make a knot bag, or you can…knot.

This pattern will go out two different ways: via an informal knitalong I’m hosting on Patreon (my page is brand new! My tentative plan is to use the patron-only posts feature for this knitalong, and then go from there; I don’t think I’ll add tiers until I feel like the initial bonus content has been a success, and the actual Patreon page has some real value for people. I’m not sure it will. I think Patreon could factor in to my knitwear design and be a viable venue for it, and help a lot with adding to the overall production values of the my independent designs, but it’s kind of uncomfortable in some ways, too, for me personally. I am not entirely sure about it), and then afterward as a basic .PDF.

I’m aiming to start the knitalong thing on June 17th! If there’s some response but not a lot, I may postpone it slightly, but other than that, we’ll aim for a Monday. Right now, my calendar is set up for updates at 3-day increments—this is a relatively quick knit, so that should be a nice pace for it.

If you’d like to join in on the Patreon knitalong, the link is here:
Become a Patron!

If not, no sweat—the Wool Market pattern will be available to everyone else just a week or two after the knitalong completes, if there’s enough interest for a knitalong in the first place, honestly.