yarn problems.

I have simultaneously too much yarn, and not enough; I have plenty of basic wool for sweaters, some of it in sweater amounts! but I don’t have very much in soft next-to-the-neck wool for scarves and shawls and hats. There’s more lightweight fine soft yarn than bulky, but I want to knit and perfect bulky hats! and I generally knit freehand and refine a new idea from there, so it takes a few iterations to be really happy with something. And I don’t want to buy more yarn, because there’s already too much yarn.

So this might mean a few sweaters, finally, and some small soft accessories; it’s led to at least one so far. And I hope to let myself be guided by yarn on hand (exclusively) for at least a little bit longer.

RELATED: OCTOBER’S FIRST OFFICIAL MOUSEARMY PATTERN.

WAVELET is a small, textured earwarmer! It’s made from a modest amount of DK to worsted-weight yarn (about 80 yards, so I am saying 80-90 officially for wiggle room and safety). It’s knit at 18 sts and 26 rows in 4″, which is a little loose if your handspun is DK to sport but nice if you’re using an expansive worsted like Malabrigo Yarns Merino Worsted. (I have two skeins of it left. They were all supposed to be one big thing, but I kept having attention span problems, so now one is the focal point of a large project, and one is going into a scarf to see if it is truly a one-skein scarf or not; it clocks at 200-210 yards in handspun, but it took 230 in bulky discontinued yarns.) It will be free until I have had time to fine-tune it, and get better photos of the third sample, so probably at least until Monday.

 

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Bunny Hat Pattern.

Two quick things for October 13th (because what could possibly go wrong?):

First, there is a flash sale going on in the little shop where I put most of my handknit samples and the occasional woven cloth. I’ve had the same host site for years, and it’s gone through a lot of changes that I haven’t necessarily enjoyed very much, but now I am no longer getting a lot of traffic from the site itself, so I’m looking for a good alternative to it.

Second, there is a knitting pattern up! If you’d rather knit your own hat, Bunny is my newest one.

DSC_0301 (559x1024) (559x1024)

Spring Feverish Series Sale, because it’s springtime somewhere, right?

I’ve just updated the Spring Feverish patterns! Now when you purchase all four of them, they’re only $3 per pattern, which is about $6 off what the total would be if you purchased them all separately, although in this case if you did purchase one of these previously, and did it via Ravelry, it will still count towards the set of four. So. You’d get a retroactive discount, sort of.

Four patterns, $12US, nice mini-projects, and every one can be worn as a neckerchief or a headwrap by average adults.  Here’s a handy link to all four.

Spring Feverish 2!

springfeverish2

Spring Feverish 2 is live! springfeverishsmallgauge

It’s a little scarf!springfeverish2main

There’s also a centered decrease discussion post just past this one, if you’re interested in that kind of thing. (It’s related to this kerchief.) I’ve actually gotten some kind notes and encouragement on the Terrible Techniques series, which is a little bit beyond my ken, though I really appreciate it in a sort of baffled way. Thanks!

Doing Things Wrong With Nick: s2tog tbl k1 psso!

 

 

IMG_20170318_190320756_HDR (1024x616)I’m about to release Spring Feverish 2! It’s been delayed a little, in part because I could not get the right drape;  I knit about four samples before I had one that matched the original in terms of fabric. This pattern is pretty beginner-friendly, featuring very traditional wave lace and a relaxing garter-stitch background/finishing, but it does have one thing to watch out for, so I decided to do a quick Techniques post about that just in case. If you’ve already knit Feather, you’ll be fine–this faux-cable decrease is the same, but written differently–less efficiently, but more clearly, I hope, by making the difference between it and a s2kpo more obvious. I hope you will forgive the length of the shorthand.

s2tog tbl k1 psso!

This decrease functions just like a s2kpo, but instead of making the stitches line up neatly, it twists them and creates a faux-cable column. You can always use s2kpo if you like! And really, the only reason to work the long, alternative decrease is to get the look of the samples. But this decrease probably takes longer to read than it does to work.

This decrease is worked over 3 stitches.

s2tog tbl–slip two together through the back loop. At this point, these slipped stitches just rest on the RH needle.

k1–knit 1. In this case, the 1 is the next stitch.

psso–pass the pair of slipped stitches, together, over the knit stitch (k1).

If you don’t like to knit through the back loop, see below!

sskpo.

You can also, just to complicate things, work this as a sl1 sl1 k1 psso, by handling your slipped stitches separately: over three stitches, slip one and then slip one again, separately, as if to knit. Then continue as above: knit one, and pass the slipped stitches over (together). You’re still slipping two stitches, and they still twist at the angle you need to create the faux cable. This is as neat or neater than s2tog tbl.
In fact, the only real reason I’ve gone from using sskpo to using the overlong s2tog tbl psso notation is that the rather long second version is less easily confused with s2kpo.

Both are different from the more standard centered two-stitch decrease:

s2kpo.

When you s2kpo (which is also worked over 3 stitches, and also makes a nice centered decrease), it goes like this:

s2–slip two together knitwise, as if you were working a k2tog and stopped halfway. These stitches also temporarily rest on the RH needle.

k–knit the next stitch.

po–pass the slipped stitches, together, over the knit stitch (k).

This creates a straight, slightly raised stockinette st line. In the photo below, the green Spring Feverish 2 kerchief is worked using s2kpo exclusively; in the pink Malabrigo Yarns Rastita sample, it’s s2tog tbl k1 psso, and you can see the faux-cable texture-rich line this creates.

New Pattern: Frank

frank

Frank is a good basic watchcap-style beanie; the warm tweed yarn really makes the hat!

It’s a structural sibling to my other hat, Driggs, but a little less absurdist, so you can knit one for yourself if you are a serious person with serious business to attend. Professional in a cold winter city? Knit this up in the luxury yarn substitute for the one I used (Queensland Collection Kathmandu=Jo Sharp Silk Road) for a warm, presentable topper.

Wear it with the brim folded for a classic watchcap look; wear it flat (this works at least for smaller sizes) and slouch it slightly for a look that is more casual and modern.

(There’s no reason why you can’t knit and wear Driggs as well, but it has a different effect when paired with the business casual ensemble I’m imagining.)